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Asked by: Fermin Sporer
Updated: 4 November 2021 09:44:00 PM

How is the phosphorus cycle different from other biogeochemical cycles?

How is the phosphorus cycle different from other biogeochemical cycles? The phosphorus cycle is different from other biogeochemical cycles because atmosphere is not important in the transfer or movement of phosphorus. Also, phosphorous compounds on Earth are normally solids of varying temperatures and pressures.

Accordingly, how is the phosphorus cycle different from the other cycles?

The phosphorus cycle differs from the cycles of other biologically important elements, such as carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur, in that it lacks a significant gaseous component; nearly all phosphorus in the environment resides either in solid or in aqueous forms.

By analogy you ask what makes the phosphorus cycle different from the carbon cycle?

The phosphorous and the carbon cycles are both biogeochemical cycles on earth that are crucial to how our world functions. The other large difference between these two cycles is that carbon cycles through the atmosphere whereas phosphorus does not . The phosphorous cycle is also slower than the carbon cycle.

Accordingly, we may wonder what is different about the phosphorus cycle as compared to the carbon and nitrogen cycle?

The phosphorus cycle differs from the nitrogen cycle and the carbon cycle because phosphorus doesn't have a gas phase as a part of the cycle.
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Related questions and answers

How are humans disrupting the phosphorus cycle?

Humans have caused major changes to the global phosphorus cycle through shipping of phosphorus minerals, and use of phosphorus fertilizer, and also the shipping of food from farms to cities, where it is lost as effluent.

How do humans impact the biogeochemical cycles?

Recently, people have been causing these biogeochemical cycles to change. When we cut down forests, make more factories, and drive more cars that burn fossil fuels, the way that carbon and nitrogen move around the Earth changes. These changes add more greenhouse gases in our atmosphere and this causes climate change.

Why is the phosphorus cycle so slow?

The phosphorus cycle is one of the slowest biogeochemical cycles because the movement of phosphorus through oceans and soil is quite slow. Unlike the other cycles including carbon, nitrogen and sulfur, phosphorus does not cycle throughout the atmosphere. Phosphorus is found in soil/rocks, water and sediments.

What are two major differences between the biogeochemical cycles of phosphorus and of nitrogen?

These form their respective biogeochemical cycles that show the movement of nitrogen and phosphorus through the lithosphere, hydrosphere an biosphere. However, the atmosphere does not play a major role in the movement of phosphorous. Of the two, nitrogen is recycled whereas phosphorus is not.

What are 3 human impacts on the phosphorus cycle?

Human Impact on the Phosphorus Cycle Humans have had a significant impact on the phosphorus cycle due to a variety of human activities, such as the use of fertilizer, the distribution of food products, and artificial eutrophication.

Why is the phosphorus cycle the slowest?

Phosphorus's abiotic reservoir isn't the atmosphere, and isn't present in a gas form in any useful amount. The chemicals having atmosphere as one of the abiotic reserves cycle more easily. These are the reasons for phosphorus cycle being the slowest biogeochemical cycle.

What are the stages of the phosphorus cycle?

Steps of Phosphorus Cycle Weathering. Absorption by Plants. Absorption by Animals. Return to the Environment through Decomposition.

What factors can disrupt the biogeochemical cycle?

found in ecosystems containing various trophic levels.
  • Natural events or human activities can disturb Biogeochemical cycles.
  • Human activities include: Overuse of fertilizers or herbicides. - runoff affects bodies of water causing algae blooms.
  • Natural events include: Volcanic activity.

What is the major difference between the nitrogen and phosphorus cycles?

Nitrogen is mainly used by humans as a fertilizer in farmlands, but its excessive usage can lead to serious problems (such as eutrophication). The phosphorus cycle involves the uptake of phosphorus by organisms.

What is unique about the phosphorus cycle?

Phosphorus can be found on earth in water, soil and sediments. Unlike the compounds of other matter cycles phosphorus cannot be found in air in the gaseous state. This is because phosphorus is usually liquid at normal temperatures and pressures. It is mainly cycling through water, soil and sediments.

What are 2 of the 3 processes included in the biogeochemical cycle?

Examples include the carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycles (nutrient cycles) and the water cycle. The carbon cycle includes the uptake of carbon dioxide by plants through, its ingestion by animals and its release to the atmosphere through respiration and decay of organic materials.

What do the nitrogen cycle and the phosphorus cycle have in common?

The nitrogen cycle involves the uptake of nitrogen form the atmosphere by a process called fixation which is carried out by microbes or industrial processes. Phosphorus in the environment is mainly found in rocks, and natural weathering processes can make it available to biological systems.

What is the problem with the phosphorus cycle?

Phosphorus is often the limiting nutrient, or nutrient that is most scarce and thus limits growth, in aquatic ecosystems. When nitrogen and phosphorus from fertilizer are carried in runoff to lakes and oceans, they can cause eutrophication, the overgrowth of algae.

What are the 4 steps of the phosphorus cycle?

  • Weathering. Phosphorus is found in the rocks in abundance.
  • Absorption by Plants. The phosphate salts dissolved in water are absorbed by the plants.
  • Absorption by Animals. The animals absorb phosphorus from the plants or by consuming plant-eating animals.
  • Return of Phosphorus Back to the Ecosystem.

What is the most important biogeochemical cycle?

One of the most important cycle in biochemical cycles is carbon cycle. Photosynthesis and respiration are important partners. While consumers emit carbon dioxide, producers (green plants and other producers) process this carbon dioxide to form oxygen. Another important biochemical cycle is nitrogen cycle.

What is the process of the phosphorus cycle?

Phosphorus moves in a cycle through rocks, water, soil and sediments and organisms. Over time, rain and weathering cause rocks to release phosphate ions and other minerals. When the plant or animal dies, it decays, and the organic phosphate is returned to the soil.

Why is biogeochemical cycles important?

Why Biogeochemical Cycles Are Important Biogeochemical cycles help explain how the planet conserves matter and uses energy. The cycles move elements through ecosystems, so the transformation of things can happen. They are also important because they store elements and recycle them.

What are the 5 steps of the phosphorus cycle?

Terms in this set (5)
  • Weathering.
  • Fertilizer. -Soil. -Direct Runoff.
  • Excretion and Decomposition.
  • Dissolved Phosphates (generally in ocean)
  • Geologic Uplift.

Does burning fossil fuels affect the phosphorus cycle?

The transformation of the global phosphorus cycle is just one example. As another example, fossil fuels have enabled the industrial-scale production of nitrogen as fertilizer. For example, increased runoff of nitrogen and phosphorus into freshwater ecosystems and oceans causes a rapid rate of eutrophication.

What are the factors that can disrupt the biogeochemical cycles?

found in ecosystems containing various trophic levels.
  • Natural events or human activities can disturb Biogeochemical cycles.
  • Human activities include: Overuse of fertilizers or herbicides. - runoff affects bodies of water causing algae blooms.
  • Natural events include: Volcanic activity.

What factors can disrupt the biogeochemical cycles?

found in ecosystems containing various trophic levels.
  • Natural events or human activities can disturb Biogeochemical cycles.
  • Human activities include: Overuse of fertilizers or herbicides. - runoff affects bodies of water causing algae blooms.
  • Natural events include: Volcanic activity.

What are the 6 steps of the phosphorus cycle?

Terms in this set (6)
  • Weathering. Weathering of uplifted rocks contributes phosphates to the land.
  • Fertilizer. Phosphate fertilizer applied to fields can run off directly into streams, become part of a soil pool, or be absorbed by plants.
  • Excretion and Decomposition.
  • Dissolved Phosphates.
  • Geologic Uplift.
  • Weathering.

What is a negative environmental problem with the phosphorus cycle?

Eutrophication is the main environmental problem caused by phosphorus pollution. Eutrophication deteriorates the water quality leading to the mortality of fish and plants. Moreover, it also reduces the use of the water for human purposes such as consumption and swimming.

What is biogeochemical cycle explain phosphorus cycle with diagram?

The phosphorus cycle is the biogeochemical cycle that describes the movement of phosphorus through the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. Low concentration of phosphorus in soils reduces plant growth and slows soil microbial growth, as shown in studies of soil microbial biomass.

What are the stages of phosphorus cycle?

Steps of Phosphorus Cycle Weathering. Absorption by Plants. Absorption by Animals. Return to the Environment through Decomposition.

What would happen if the phosphorus cycle was disrupted?

It can result in excessive plant growth (including algae). This can in turn clog our water pipes and filters and interfere with human activities (such as swimming and fishing). When this algae dies, it may result in decreased water quality, causing malodorous and poor tasting drinking water.

How do humans negatively impact the phosphorus cycle?

Humans have had a significant impact on the phosphorus cycle due to a variety of human activities, such as the use of fertilizer, the distribution of food products, and artificial eutrophication. Thus, human activities serve to harm aquatic ecosystems, whenever excess amounts of phosphorus are leached into the water.